Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Poetry’ Category

Joe-Pan-bw

 

DC

Green shoots on one side
of a January branch—
half choose hope

Congress—the mighty chambers—
a heart? a stomach?—two dogs
wrestling over street meat

The South 

Crawfish, a hundred perhaps, boiling
in a pot—a lava of spooning hoards—
we’ll suck the juices from their heads
& sex ourselves to sleep.

Thousands led to a stadium’s
mouth—the stadium
is fed better

Pecos River, Texas

My hand upon a man’s hand
blown red with paint dust
ten thousand years ago

 

Joe Pan’s first collection, Autobiomythography & Gallery, was named “Best First Book of the Year” by Coldfront. He is the founding editor & publisher of Brooklyn Arts Press & serves as the poetry editor for the arts magazine Hyperallergic. His work has appeared in such places as Boston Review, Brooklyn Rail, Cimarron Review, Denver Quarterly, Glimmer Train, H_ngm_n, Phoebe, & has been excerpted in The New York Times. He grew up along the Space Coast of Florida and now lives in Brooklyn.

Read Full Post »

CTM Pic

Screen Shot 2014-10-12 at 11.20.13 PM

Carey McHugh’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Boston ReviewDenver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, and Tin House, among others. Her chapbook Original Instructions for the Perfect Preservation of Birds &c. was selected by Rae Armantrout for the Poetry Society of America’s 2008 New York Chapbook Fellowship. She lives and works in Manhattan.

This poem, “[You will come first as a sound],” has previously appeared in Gulf Coast, under the title “Open Brackets Closed Brackets.”

Read Full Post »

Later, Knives & Trees by Maureen Alsop

Later, Knives & Trees by Maureen Alsop

 

Maureen Alsop (Mantic, Augury Books, 2013) has recently published a new full-length poetry collection entitled Later, Knives & Trees with Negative Capability Press. Praised by many, including E.C. Belli and the late Hillary Gravendyk, Later, Knives & Trees deals largely with subjects of grief and coping with death. We are glad to include a poem from that collection, “Sanctimony,” below.

 

SANCTIMONY

You are a fine one after all— you among the beginnings are my beginning. Among delicate patterns of birds, sparks shepherding
Sun slim contrails like a small intimacy, the pewter sky’s glassy
impression toward night, a ritual with time. Perhaps dear,

I might judge the shadow of myself, the slight will of my shadow that keeps things just.

The dead live beneath the reach of snow—
without intimation I record collusions temporal heat. I keep record of your records.

 

Negative Capability Press was founded in Mobile, Alabama and has been publishing award-winning books since 1981. They are a Member of APSS: Association of Publishers for Special Sales (formerly SPAN). More information on the press, as well as Later, Knives & Trees, can be found at their website.

Read Full Post »

Photo by Dave Bledsoe, Free Verse Photography

Photo by Dave Bledsoe, FreeVerse Photography

We are excited to acknowledge that Pennsylvania-based journal Print-Oriented Bastards has recently interviewed Frances Justine Post (BEAST, Augury Books, 2014). The interview, conducted by Ines Pujos, POB’s senior editor, covers questions of process, environmental influence, and the overall aesthetics of BEAST.

Post: ‘Self-Portrait as Beast’ was the first self-portrait poem I’d ever written. Though it was new to me, there is a long tradition of self-portrait poems (Lucie Brock-Broido and John Ashbery come to mind). I found myself most drawn to writing ‘Self Portrait as…’ poems. Rather than writing straight-up self-portrait poems about my actual self, I started treating them as almost-persona poems. In these poems, I’m not really trying to speak in the voice of someone else. I am still the speaker; I just try on different skins for a little while.”

The whole of the interview, as well as the rest of issue 4, can be read online!

Read Full Post »

Photo by Dave Bledsoe, Free Verse Photography

Photo by Dave Bledsoe, FreeVerse Photography

Snow Amulet, Superscription,” from Maureen Alsop’s most recent collection, Later, Knives & Trees (Negative Capability Press, 2014), has been adapted to video at Poetry Storehouse by fellow poet Nic Sebastian. Poetry Storehouse acts as a database of poetry offered up by authors to be collaboratively “remixed.” Past texts, including more of Alsop’s work, have been recreated through audio and video, and are available to listen/view at Poetry Storehouse’s site.

In addition, Alsop will be reading at Your Impossible Voice’s launch party for their fifth issue at Alley Cat Books in San Francisco. Featured readers include Aaron Shurin, Gillian Conoley, Marianne Villanueva, Rachel Nagelberg, and Laia García Sánchez. Head over to YIP for more info.

For more information on Later, Knives & Trees, head over to Negative Capability Press.

More of Alsop’s recent work can be read at Arcadia University’s Marathon Literary Review and New Michigan Press’s Diagram.

—-

Maureen Alsop’s MANTIC

buy5._V192207739_

Read Full Post »

Photo by Dave Bledsoe, Free Verse Photography

Photo by Dave Bledsoe, FreeVerse Photography

Frances Justine Post’s Beast (Augury Books, 2014) has received a micro-review in the latest edition of The Boston Review. Kay Cosgrove, poetry editor at Gulf Coast, commented on Beast‘s aesthetic approach and thematic development:

Though the collection’s narrative arc is familiar… the phrasing Post uses to convey it is dazzling, dangerous, visceral, and new… The poems dismantle the binaries of you and me, then and now, self and other, and singular and plural as they investigate, almost obsessively, how experience uproots and shapes us.”

The September/October issue is now available on newsstands. Additionally, each article from the current issue will soon be available to read online. Check back at The Boston Review’s site for updates.

—-

More on BEAST

buy5._V192207739_

Read Full Post »

Bruce Covey doing introductions at a "What's New in Poetry?" reading

Bruce Covey doing introductions at a “What’s New in Poetry?” reading

Bruce Covey, publisher and editor at Coconut Books, recently announced the closing of “What’s New in Poetry?,” a reading series organized by Covey at Emory University in Atlanta. The series ran for 12 years, co-hosted by Coconut Magazine’s senior editor, Gina Meyers, from 2011-2014, and brought over 300 new and emerging poets to students at the university. Covey recently shed some light on the beginning and end of an expansive venture in contemporary poetry.

 

Nick: What drove you to start ‘What’s New in Poetry?’

Bruce: At the time, I was teaching Creative Writing at Emory, and the Program brought only 1-2 poets per year to campus, all of whom were recognized and widely lauded figures.  More than once my students told me about the distance they felt from these readers–they couldn’t imagine what had to happen for them to get from point A (where they were at the moment) to point B (e.g., winning a Pulitzer Prize).  Also at the time there wasn’t much of an independent reading scene in Atlanta–a pretty established slam series, but not much else.  I wanted to start a series that focused on writers with 0-2 books that took place in the Emory residence halls–bringing poetry to the students on their own terms and in their own homes.  In addition to these younger writers, I wanted to feature more established small press and experimental writers, so students could be exposed to a wide range of aesthetics (the Creative Writing department as a whole tended to favor very traditional poets).  In every case, I asked writers to hang around after the readings just to talk with students.  Pretty soon after that, the series started to draw poets from the Atlanta community.  And not long after that our audience expanded to 70-100 per event.

N: Is there a reading that sticks out in your mind, for whatever reason, as remarkable? A particular poet? A moment?

B: Honestly, I really loved all of our readers and readings–I love poetry readings, and everyone has been wonderful.  But meeting Ron Padgett for the first time was wonderful.  He was one of the first two poets (along with Ted Berrigan) I’d read and liked (in high school).  It’s the most nervous I’d been before a reading, but Ron was incredibly nice and gave an incredible reading–totally humble and funny and powerful as his work always is.  But we’ve had a lot of terrific moments.

N: Do you think the closing of the series will be a blow to the poetry community at Emory? In Atlanta?

B: I guess so?  I mean, Atlanta has some great and relatively recent reading series that have already and will continue to bring awesome poets to town.  And I’m not sure how much we remained on Emory’s radar after I stopped teaching & after Harmony Neal and Molly Brodak left as fellows–even though the series took place on campus, we didn’t draw many students over the past two years.  The gap we leave is probably one of volume (we brought more than 70 readers last year) and the fact that we could pay each reader–something I was always proud of. That said, I’m not worried about poetry thriving in Atlanta–it will continue to do so, and I’ll still be around with Coconut and other things.

 

The final events in the series are listed on Facebook. A large portion of “What’s New in Poetry?” readings can be listened to and downloaded for free via iTunes. Links to this material and a full archive of the series’ past events can be found at the Emory Poetry Council webpage.

Also, Coconut Magazine’s submission period is currently open! Head over to their site for more details.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 206 other followers